Concepts of Mental Activities and Verbs in Children of High and Average Verbal Intelligence

Joyce M. Alexander, Caroline R. Noyes, Elizabeth K. MacBrayer, Paula J. Schwanenflugel, William Fabricius

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In order to understand the contribution of increased cognitive abilities to children's naive theories of mind, children of high and average verbal intelligence rated their understanding of the interrelationships between and among mental activities and verbs. In Study 1, participants rated the similarity of pairs of prototypical mental activity scenarios according to the "way you use your mind" in each one. The scenarios represented the categories of list memory, prospective memory, comprehension, selective attention, inference, planning, comparison, and recognition. In Study 2, participants rated the similarity of cognitive and affective verbs (e.g., decide, memorize, love, worry). Multi-dimensional scaling and clustering analyses indicated very similar organization and structure of concepts in children of high and average verbal intelligence in both studies. These results add to the growing body of literature suggesting that metacognitive development and its association with intelligence differ depending on the type of metacognition being examined (Alexander, Carr, & Schwanenflugel, 1995).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)16-27
Number of pages12
JournalGifted Child Quarterly
Volume42
Issue number1
StatePublished - Dec 1998

Fingerprint

Intelligence
intelligence
scenario
Theory of Mind
Aptitude
Episodic Memory
Love
multidimensional scaling
cognitive ability
Cluster Analysis
love
comprehension
organization
planning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

Alexander, J. M., Noyes, C. R., MacBrayer, E. K., Schwanenflugel, P. J., & Fabricius, W. (1998). Concepts of Mental Activities and Verbs in Children of High and Average Verbal Intelligence. Gifted Child Quarterly, 42(1), 16-27.

Concepts of Mental Activities and Verbs in Children of High and Average Verbal Intelligence. / Alexander, Joyce M.; Noyes, Caroline R.; MacBrayer, Elizabeth K.; Schwanenflugel, Paula J.; Fabricius, William.

In: Gifted Child Quarterly, Vol. 42, No. 1, 12.1998, p. 16-27.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Alexander, JM, Noyes, CR, MacBrayer, EK, Schwanenflugel, PJ & Fabricius, W 1998, 'Concepts of Mental Activities and Verbs in Children of High and Average Verbal Intelligence', Gifted Child Quarterly, vol. 42, no. 1, pp. 16-27.
Alexander, Joyce M. ; Noyes, Caroline R. ; MacBrayer, Elizabeth K. ; Schwanenflugel, Paula J. ; Fabricius, William. / Concepts of Mental Activities and Verbs in Children of High and Average Verbal Intelligence. In: Gifted Child Quarterly. 1998 ; Vol. 42, No. 1. pp. 16-27.
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