Computing by programmable particles

Joshua J. Daymude, Kristian Hinnenthal, Andrea Richa, Christian Scheideler

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The vision for programmable matter is to realize a physical substance that is scalable, versatile, instantly reconfigurable, safe to handle, and robust to failures. Programmable matter could be deployed in a variety of domain spaces to address a wide gamut of problems, including applications in construction, environmental science, synthetic biology, and space exploration. However, there are considerable engineering and computational challenges that must be overcome before such a system could be implemented. Towards developing efficient algorithms for novel programmable matter behaviors, the amoebot model for self-organizing particle systems and its variant, hybrid programmable matter, provide formal computational frameworks that facilitate rigorous algorithmic research. In this chapter, we discuss distributed algorithms under these models for shape formation, shape recognition, object coating, compression, shortcut bridging, and separation in addition to some underlying algorithmic primitives.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages615-681
Number of pages67
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume11340 LNCS
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Fingerprint

Synthetic Biology
Shape Recognition
Self-organizing Systems
Computing
Object recognition
Particle System
Distributed Algorithms
Parallel algorithms
Coating
Compaction
Efficient Algorithms
Compression
Engineering
Coatings
Model
Vision
Object
Framework

Keywords

  • Distributed algorithms
  • Programmable matter
  • Self-organizing particle systems

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Theoretical Computer Science
  • Computer Science(all)

Cite this

Daymude, J. J., Hinnenthal, K., Richa, A., & Scheideler, C. (2019). Computing by programmable particles. In Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) (pp. 615-681). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 11340 LNCS). Springer Verlag. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-11072-7_22

Computing by programmable particles. / Daymude, Joshua J.; Hinnenthal, Kristian; Richa, Andrea; Scheideler, Christian.

Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Springer Verlag, 2019. p. 615-681 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 11340 LNCS).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Daymude, JJ, Hinnenthal, K, Richa, A & Scheideler, C 2019, Computing by programmable particles. in Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 11340 LNCS, Springer Verlag, pp. 615-681. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-11072-7_22
Daymude JJ, Hinnenthal K, Richa A, Scheideler C. Computing by programmable particles. In Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Springer Verlag. 2019. p. 615-681. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-11072-7_22
Daymude, Joshua J. ; Hinnenthal, Kristian ; Richa, Andrea ; Scheideler, Christian. / Computing by programmable particles. Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Springer Verlag, 2019. pp. 615-681 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)).
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