Complexities in Adjustment Patterns among the “Best and the Brightest”: Risk and Resilience in the Context of High Achieving Schools

Ashley M. Ebbert, Nina L. Kumar, Suniya Luthar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Youth in high achieving schools (HAS) are at elevated risk for serious adjustment problems—including internalizing and externalizing symptoms and substance use—given unrelenting pressures to be “the best.” For resilience researchers, successful risk evasion in these high-pressure settings should, arguably, be defined in terms of the absence of serious symptoms plus behaviorally manifested integrity and altruism. Future interventions should target that which is the fundamental basis of resilience: Dependable, supportive relationships in everyday settings. These must be promoted between adults and children and among them, toward enhancing positive development among youth and families in these high stress environments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)21-34
Number of pages14
JournalResearch in Human Development
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2019
Externally publishedYes

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Social Adjustment
Altruism
Risk Adjustment
Pressure
Research Personnel

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Complexities in Adjustment Patterns among the “Best and the Brightest” : Risk and Resilience in the Context of High Achieving Schools. / Ebbert, Ashley M.; Kumar, Nina L.; Luthar, Suniya.

In: Research in Human Development, Vol. 16, No. 1, 02.01.2019, p. 21-34.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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