College students’ influenza vaccine hesitation: a reasoned action investigation with quantitative and qualitative data

Paul A. Mongeau, Yanqin Liu, Emi C. Hashi, Anthony J. Roberto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This two-wave longitudinal study (performed pre-COVID), using both quantitative and qualitative data, investigated college students’ influenza vaccine hesitancy and confidence using the theory of planned behavior (TPB). At Time 1, college students (n = 277) completed TPB measures and reported past influenza vaccine behavior. At Time 2 (30 days later), participants indicated whether they received the influenza vaccine since Time 1. At Time 2, participants who indicated that they had not received the influenza vaccine since Time 1 also described their most important reasons for not doing so. The TPB model fit the quantitative data well; direct paths from attitude and norms to intention, and from intention to future behavior, were strong and significant. The TPB model explained 71% of the variance in intention and 28% of the variance in future behavior. Neither perceived behavioral control nor past behavior improved the model’s ability to predict intentions or future behavior. From the qualitative data, participants’ reasons for not getting vaccinated focused on perceived behavioral control (e.g., time cost) and attitudes (e.g., unimportance and low susceptibility). Theoretical implications for message development are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Behavioral Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • College students
  • Flu shot
  • Influenza vaccine
  • Theory of planned behavior
  • Vaccine hesitancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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