Clinical phenomenology, somatic symptoms, and distress in Hispanic/Latino and European American youths with anxiety disorders

Armando Pina, Wendy K. Silverman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

110 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study compared clinic-anxious Hispanic/Latino and European American youths (ages 6 to 17 years old) along sociodemographic and clinical variables. Groups were relatively similar, although significant differences emerged as a function of ethno-cultural and language choice (English, Spanish) used during the assessment. Within the English language choice group, Cuban American (CA) youths reported somatic symptoms as less distressing than non-Cuban American Hispanic/Latino (non-CA/HL) youths. Conversely, within the Spanish language choice group, CA youths reported somatic symptoms as more distressing than non-CA/HL youths. Also, parents in the European American and CA groups reported their youths as having less somatic symptoms than parents in the non-CA/HL group. Implications of findings are discussed, particularly regarding possible cultural significance of somatic symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)227-236
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Anxiety Disorders
Hispanic Americans
Language
Medically Unexplained Symptoms
Parents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

@article{e118fd8f897e420eaf15d83ba10b70fb,
title = "Clinical phenomenology, somatic symptoms, and distress in Hispanic/Latino and European American youths with anxiety disorders",
abstract = "This study compared clinic-anxious Hispanic/Latino and European American youths (ages 6 to 17 years old) along sociodemographic and clinical variables. Groups were relatively similar, although significant differences emerged as a function of ethno-cultural and language choice (English, Spanish) used during the assessment. Within the English language choice group, Cuban American (CA) youths reported somatic symptoms as less distressing than non-Cuban American Hispanic/Latino (non-CA/HL) youths. Conversely, within the Spanish language choice group, CA youths reported somatic symptoms as more distressing than non-CA/HL youths. Also, parents in the European American and CA groups reported their youths as having less somatic symptoms than parents in the non-CA/HL group. Implications of findings are discussed, particularly regarding possible cultural significance of somatic symptoms.",
author = "Armando Pina and Silverman, {Wendy K.}",
year = "2004",
doi = "10.1207/s15374424jccp3302_3",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "33",
pages = "227--236",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology",
issn = "1537-4416",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Clinical phenomenology, somatic symptoms, and distress in Hispanic/Latino and European American youths with anxiety disorders

AU - Pina, Armando

AU - Silverman, Wendy K.

PY - 2004

Y1 - 2004

N2 - This study compared clinic-anxious Hispanic/Latino and European American youths (ages 6 to 17 years old) along sociodemographic and clinical variables. Groups were relatively similar, although significant differences emerged as a function of ethno-cultural and language choice (English, Spanish) used during the assessment. Within the English language choice group, Cuban American (CA) youths reported somatic symptoms as less distressing than non-Cuban American Hispanic/Latino (non-CA/HL) youths. Conversely, within the Spanish language choice group, CA youths reported somatic symptoms as more distressing than non-CA/HL youths. Also, parents in the European American and CA groups reported their youths as having less somatic symptoms than parents in the non-CA/HL group. Implications of findings are discussed, particularly regarding possible cultural significance of somatic symptoms.

AB - This study compared clinic-anxious Hispanic/Latino and European American youths (ages 6 to 17 years old) along sociodemographic and clinical variables. Groups were relatively similar, although significant differences emerged as a function of ethno-cultural and language choice (English, Spanish) used during the assessment. Within the English language choice group, Cuban American (CA) youths reported somatic symptoms as less distressing than non-Cuban American Hispanic/Latino (non-CA/HL) youths. Conversely, within the Spanish language choice group, CA youths reported somatic symptoms as more distressing than non-CA/HL youths. Also, parents in the European American and CA groups reported their youths as having less somatic symptoms than parents in the non-CA/HL group. Implications of findings are discussed, particularly regarding possible cultural significance of somatic symptoms.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=2442646527&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=2442646527&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1207/s15374424jccp3302_3

DO - 10.1207/s15374424jccp3302_3

M3 - Article

VL - 33

SP - 227

EP - 236

JO - Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology

JF - Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology

SN - 1537-4416

IS - 2

ER -