Child- and family-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy for pediatric bipolar disorder: A randomized clinical trial

Amy E. West, Sally M. Weinstein, Amy T. Peters, Andrea C. Katz, David B. Henry, Rick A. Cruz, Mani N. Pavuluri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

54 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Previous studies have found that family-based psychosocial treatments are effective adjuncts to pharmacotherapy among adults and adolescents with bipolar disorder (BD). The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of adjunctive child- and family-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy (CFF-CBT) to psychotherapy as usual (control) for mood symptom severity and global functioning in children with BD. Method: Sixty-nine youth, aged 7 to 13 years (mean = 9.19, SD = 1.61) with DSM-IV-TR bipolar I, II, or not otherwise specified (NOS) disorder were randomly assigned to CFF-CBT or control groups. Both treatments consisted of 12 weekly sessions followed by 6 monthly booster sessions delivered over a total of 9 months. Independent evaluators assessed participants at baseline, week 4, week 8, week 12 (posttreatment), and week 39 (6-month follow-up). Results: Participants in CFF-CBT attended more sessions, were less likely to drop out, and reported greater satisfaction with treatment than controls. CFF-CBT demonstrated efficacy compared to the control treatment in reducing parent-reported mania at posttreatment and depression symptoms at posttreatment and follow-up. Global functioning did not differ at posttreatment but was higher among CFF-CBT participants at follow-up. Conclusion: CFF-CBT may be efficacious in reducing acute mood symptoms and improving long-term psychosocial functioning among children with BD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1168-1178.e1
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume53
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cognitive-behavioral therapy
  • Family-focused intervention
  • Pediatric bipolar disorder
  • Randomized clinical trial

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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