Changing health practices: The experience from a worksite health promotion project

Jennie J. Kronenfeld, Kirby L. Jackson, Keith E. Davis, Steven N. Blair

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper uses data from an employee health promotion project for government employees to examine initial health practices and their relationship to social and demographic variables. It then uses data collected one year later to examine changes in health behaviors and to try to explain what types of people are most likely to undertake health behavior changes in a year, within the context of a worksite health promotion project. Most people in this sample of employees do make positive changes in health habits in at least one of the following areas: smoking, seatbelt usage, diet, exercise, alcohol usage. While a variety of different social and demographic variables are important in explaining initial differences in health practices, these same variables along with measures of personal efficacy and job stress are poor predictors of whether people change their health behavior over a year. Future research might usefully focus on more detailed collection of qualitative data to help understand what factors motivate people to change health behavior. Future survey approaches may then incorporate broader and more diverse categories of explanatory variables into regression models.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)515-523
Number of pages9
JournalSocial Science and Medicine
Volume26
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1988
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Health Behavior
Health Promotion
health behavior
Workplace
health promotion
Health
employee
health
experience
Demography
Occupational Health
Habits
habits
smoking
Smoking
alcohol
Alcohols
Exercise
Diet
regression

Keywords

  • health behavior
  • worksite health promotion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Social Psychology
  • Development
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Changing health practices : The experience from a worksite health promotion project. / Kronenfeld, Jennie J.; Jackson, Kirby L.; Davis, Keith E.; Blair, Steven N.

In: Social Science and Medicine, Vol. 26, No. 5, 1988, p. 515-523.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kronenfeld, Jennie J. ; Jackson, Kirby L. ; Davis, Keith E. ; Blair, Steven N. / Changing health practices : The experience from a worksite health promotion project. In: Social Science and Medicine. 1988 ; Vol. 26, No. 5. pp. 515-523.
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