Black Kin Caregivers: Acceptability and Cultural Adaptation of the Family Check-Up/Everyday Parenting Program

Qi Wu, Judy Krysik, Anthony Thornton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Black children join kinship care disproportionately and black kin caregivers often face financial, housing, mental health, and parenting challenges when caring for relative children. Few interventions have been developed specifically for kin caregivers, let alone Black kin caregivers. This study evaluated the initial acceptability of an evidence based parenting intervention and worked to culturally adapt it for Black kin caregivers. The intervention was delivered in a family camp format. Feedback from participant interviews were analyzed for this study. Participants felt that overall the intervention was culturally appropriate. However, they also proposed changes to the curriculum, as well as to the process and format of the intervention. This study experienced challenges in terms of participant recruitment and sample size, which was exacerbated by COVID-19-related safety concerns. Future steps regarding recruitment, content, and format are discussed. Implications for child welfare practice, policy, and research are also provided.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalChild and Adolescent Social Work Journal
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • Black
  • Cultural adaptation
  • Family Check-Up
  • Kin caregiver
  • Parenting intervention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Social Sciences(all)

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