Abstract

For the first time, we demonstrate chromate (Cr(VI)) bioreduction using methane (CH4) as the sole electron donor in a membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR). The experiments were divided into five stages lasting a total of 90 days, and each stage achieved a steady state for at least 15 days. Due to continued acclimation of the microbial community, the Cr(VI)-reducing capacity of the biofilm kept increasing. Cr(VI) removal at the end of the 90-day test reached 95% at an influent Cr(VI) concentration of 3 mg Cr/L and a surface loading of 0.37g of Cr m-2 day-1. Meiothermus (Deinococci), a potential Cr(VI)-reducing bacterium, was negligible in the inoculum but dominated the MBfR biofilm after Cr(VI) was added to the reactor, while Methylosinus, a type II methanotrophs, represented 11%-21% of the total bacterial DNA in the biofilm. Synergy within a microbial consortia likely was responsible for Cr(VI) reduction based on CH4 oxidation. In the synergy, methanotrophs fermented CH4 to produce metabolic intermediates that were used by the Cr(VI)-reducing bacteria as electron donors. Solid Cr(III) was the main product, accounting for more than 88% of the reduced Cr in most cases. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDS) analysis showed that Cr(III) accumulated inside and outside of some bacterial cells, implying that different Cr(VI)-reducing mechanisms were involved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5832-5839
Number of pages8
JournalEnvironmental Science and Technology
Volume50
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 7 2016

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Chromates
chromate
Methane
Biofilms
biofilm
methane
membrane
Membranes
electron
bacterium
acclimation
Bacteria
X-ray spectroscopy
microbial community
reactor
chromium hexavalent ion
Bacterial DNA
DNA
Electrons
oxidation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry

Cite this

Lai, C. Y., Zhong, L., Zhang, Y., Chen, J. X., Wen, L. L., Shi, L. D., ... Zhao, H. P. (2016). Bioreduction of Chromate in a Methane-Based Membrane Biofilm Reactor. Environmental Science and Technology, 50(11), 5832-5839. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.5b06177

Bioreduction of Chromate in a Methane-Based Membrane Biofilm Reactor. / Lai, Chun Yu; Zhong, Liang; Zhang, Yin; Chen, Jia Xian; Wen, Li Lian; Shi, Ling Dong; Sun, Yan Ping; Ma, Fang; Rittmann, Bruce; Zhou, Chen; Tang, Youneng; Zheng, Ping; Zhao, He Ping.

In: Environmental Science and Technology, Vol. 50, No. 11, 07.06.2016, p. 5832-5839.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lai, CY, Zhong, L, Zhang, Y, Chen, JX, Wen, LL, Shi, LD, Sun, YP, Ma, F, Rittmann, B, Zhou, C, Tang, Y, Zheng, P & Zhao, HP 2016, 'Bioreduction of Chromate in a Methane-Based Membrane Biofilm Reactor', Environmental Science and Technology, vol. 50, no. 11, pp. 5832-5839. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.5b06177
Lai, Chun Yu ; Zhong, Liang ; Zhang, Yin ; Chen, Jia Xian ; Wen, Li Lian ; Shi, Ling Dong ; Sun, Yan Ping ; Ma, Fang ; Rittmann, Bruce ; Zhou, Chen ; Tang, Youneng ; Zheng, Ping ; Zhao, He Ping. / Bioreduction of Chromate in a Methane-Based Membrane Biofilm Reactor. In: Environmental Science and Technology. 2016 ; Vol. 50, No. 11. pp. 5832-5839.
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AU - Chen, Jia Xian

AU - Wen, Li Lian

AU - Shi, Ling Dong

AU - Sun, Yan Ping

AU - Ma, Fang

AU - Rittmann, Bruce

AU - Zhou, Chen

AU - Tang, Youneng

AU - Zheng, Ping

AU - Zhao, He Ping

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AB - For the first time, we demonstrate chromate (Cr(VI)) bioreduction using methane (CH4) as the sole electron donor in a membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR). The experiments were divided into five stages lasting a total of 90 days, and each stage achieved a steady state for at least 15 days. Due to continued acclimation of the microbial community, the Cr(VI)-reducing capacity of the biofilm kept increasing. Cr(VI) removal at the end of the 90-day test reached 95% at an influent Cr(VI) concentration of 3 mg Cr/L and a surface loading of 0.37g of Cr m-2 day-1. Meiothermus (Deinococci), a potential Cr(VI)-reducing bacterium, was negligible in the inoculum but dominated the MBfR biofilm after Cr(VI) was added to the reactor, while Methylosinus, a type II methanotrophs, represented 11%-21% of the total bacterial DNA in the biofilm. Synergy within a microbial consortia likely was responsible for Cr(VI) reduction based on CH4 oxidation. In the synergy, methanotrophs fermented CH4 to produce metabolic intermediates that were used by the Cr(VI)-reducing bacteria as electron donors. Solid Cr(III) was the main product, accounting for more than 88% of the reduced Cr in most cases. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDS) analysis showed that Cr(III) accumulated inside and outside of some bacterial cells, implying that different Cr(VI)-reducing mechanisms were involved.

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