Beyond reliance and compliance

Human-automation coordination and cooperation

Erin Chiou, John D. Lee

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Increasingly autonomous machines may lead to issues in human-automation systems that go beyond the typical concerns of reliance and compliance. This study used an interaction-oriented approach that considers interdependence in coordinating and cooperating on a joint task. A shared-resource microworld environment was developed to assess how changes in environmental demands and agent behavior affect cooperation and system performance. Seventy-two participants were recruited to perform a scheduling task that required coordination with a cooperative and a relatively uncooperative automated agent. Cooperative automation enhanced performance because it provided more resources to the person and because the person provided more resources to the automation. Considering interdependence theory and the associated structure, signal, strategy, and sequence of human-automation interaction can guide design for appropriate trust and cooperation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2015 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2015
PublisherHuman Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc.
Pages195-199
Number of pages5
Volume2015-January
ISBN (Electronic)9780945289470
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes
Event59th International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014 - Los Angeles, United States
Duration: Oct 26 2015Oct 30 2015

Other

Other59th International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014
CountryUnited States
CityLos Angeles
Period10/26/1510/30/15

Fingerprint

automation
Automation
interdependence
joint tasks
resources
human being
interaction
scheduling
performance
Scheduling
Compliance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Chiou, E., & Lee, J. D. (2015). Beyond reliance and compliance: Human-automation coordination and cooperation. In 2015 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2015 (Vol. 2015-January, pp. 195-199). Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1177/1541931215591040

Beyond reliance and compliance : Human-automation coordination and cooperation. / Chiou, Erin; Lee, John D.

2015 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2015. Vol. 2015-January Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc., 2015. p. 195-199.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Chiou, E & Lee, JD 2015, Beyond reliance and compliance: Human-automation coordination and cooperation. in 2015 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2015. vol. 2015-January, Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc., pp. 195-199, 59th International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014, Los Angeles, United States, 10/26/15. https://doi.org/10.1177/1541931215591040
Chiou E, Lee JD. Beyond reliance and compliance: Human-automation coordination and cooperation. In 2015 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2015. Vol. 2015-January. Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc. 2015. p. 195-199 https://doi.org/10.1177/1541931215591040
Chiou, Erin ; Lee, John D. / Beyond reliance and compliance : Human-automation coordination and cooperation. 2015 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2015. Vol. 2015-January Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc., 2015. pp. 195-199
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