Attitudes toward rape victims: Effects of gender and professional status

Bradley H. White, Sharon Kurpius

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the relationship of gender and professional status on attitudes toward rape victims. The Attitudes Toward Rape Victims Scale was completed by 74 upper-class undergraduates (20 males, 54 females), 78 beginning graduate students in counseling (18 males, 60 females), and 45 mental health professionals (22 males, 23 females). The 2 × 3 analysis of variance revealed both gender and professional status differences and a significant interaction. Male undergraduates had the most negative attitudes toward rape victims, and female professionals had the most favorable attitudes. All men still hold more negative attitudes toward rape victims than do their female counterparts, regardless of professional status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)989-995
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
Volume14
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 1999
Externally publishedYes

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rape
gender
upper class
analysis of variance
health professionals
Counseling
counseling
Analysis of Variance
Mental Health
mental health
graduate
Students
interaction
student

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Attitudes toward rape victims : Effects of gender and professional status. / White, Bradley H.; Kurpius, Sharon.

In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, Vol. 14, No. 9, 09.1999, p. 989-995.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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