Assessing alcohol and other drug prevention needs among Indigenous youth ages 13–17: Developing a culturally grounded Indigenous youth harm reduction intervention

Matt Ignacio, Sarah Sense-Wilson, Danielle Lucero, Rana Crowder, Jane J. Lee, Amelia R. Gavin, Felicia M. Mitchell, Mike Spencer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Perceptions of alcohol and other drug (AOD) use, harm reduction, and culture were examined among 10 U.S. Indigenous youth 13–17 years of age. Key findings were contextualized within the four constructs of Indigenous relationality: (a) youth understand the harms of AOD use (people); (b) youth appreciate non-abstinence-based education (ideas); (c) youth need safe spaces to talk about the impacts of AOD use (place); and (d) youth desire to help prevent AOD harms for themselves and others (cosmos). Findings from this community-based participatory study serve as the theoretical foundation to support the development of an Indigenous youth harm reduction intervention to prevent AOD use and related harms among urban Indigenous youth in the Pacific Northwest.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • alcohol and other drugs
  • American Indian/Alaska Native youth
  • CBPR
  • culture
  • Harm reduction
  • Indigenous young adults
  • prevention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Assessing alcohol and other drug prevention needs among Indigenous youth ages 13–17: Developing a culturally grounded Indigenous youth harm reduction intervention'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this