Apples and oranges: Comparing schedule- and contention-based medium access control

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Comparison of schedule and contention based MAC protocols is made difficult by their fundamental differences in approach to medium access control. This paper provides a way in which to analyze and compare MAC protocols regardless of their underlying allocation strategy. To that end a framework is developed in which the persistence of any protocol, contention- or schedule-based, can be measured. The framework is used to measure and compare the persistence levels of two prototypical contention- and schedule-based MACs, IEEE 802.11 and Scheduled p-Persistence. An ideal persistence that provides lexicographically max-min fair access to the channel is characterized, and used as a bandwidth allocation scheme. In addition to reducing the unfairness, simulations employing the ideal persistence values show increased throughput and decreased delay and drop rate when compared to either Scheduled p-Persistence or IEEE 802.11.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMSWiM'10 - Proceedings of the 13th ACM International Conference on Modeling, Analysis, and Simulation of Wireless and Mobile Systems
Pages319-326
Number of pages8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
Event13th ACM International Conference on Modeling, Analysis and Simulation of Wireless and Mobile Systems, MSWiM 2010 - Bodrum, Turkey
Duration: Oct 17 2010Oct 21 2010

Other

Other13th ACM International Conference on Modeling, Analysis and Simulation of Wireless and Mobile Systems, MSWiM 2010
CountryTurkey
CityBodrum
Period10/17/1010/21/10

Fingerprint

Apple
Frequency allocation
Medium Access Control
Medium access control
Contention
Persistence
Schedule
Throughput
MAC Protocol
IEEE 802.11
Bandwidth Allocation
Min-max
Simulation

Keywords

  • contention
  • medium access control
  • persistence
  • schedule

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computational Theory and Mathematics
  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Modeling and Simulation

Cite this

Lutz, J., Colbourn, C., & Syrotiuk, V. (2010). Apples and oranges: Comparing schedule- and contention-based medium access control. In MSWiM'10 - Proceedings of the 13th ACM International Conference on Modeling, Analysis, and Simulation of Wireless and Mobile Systems (pp. 319-326) https://doi.org/10.1145/1868521.1868573

Apples and oranges : Comparing schedule- and contention-based medium access control. / Lutz, Jonathan; Colbourn, Charles; Syrotiuk, Violet.

MSWiM'10 - Proceedings of the 13th ACM International Conference on Modeling, Analysis, and Simulation of Wireless and Mobile Systems. 2010. p. 319-326.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Lutz, J, Colbourn, C & Syrotiuk, V 2010, Apples and oranges: Comparing schedule- and contention-based medium access control. in MSWiM'10 - Proceedings of the 13th ACM International Conference on Modeling, Analysis, and Simulation of Wireless and Mobile Systems. pp. 319-326, 13th ACM International Conference on Modeling, Analysis and Simulation of Wireless and Mobile Systems, MSWiM 2010, Bodrum, Turkey, 10/17/10. https://doi.org/10.1145/1868521.1868573
Lutz J, Colbourn C, Syrotiuk V. Apples and oranges: Comparing schedule- and contention-based medium access control. In MSWiM'10 - Proceedings of the 13th ACM International Conference on Modeling, Analysis, and Simulation of Wireless and Mobile Systems. 2010. p. 319-326 https://doi.org/10.1145/1868521.1868573
Lutz, Jonathan ; Colbourn, Charles ; Syrotiuk, Violet. / Apples and oranges : Comparing schedule- and contention-based medium access control. MSWiM'10 - Proceedings of the 13th ACM International Conference on Modeling, Analysis, and Simulation of Wireless and Mobile Systems. 2010. pp. 319-326
@inproceedings{22d740c3408844f6bd1c742d10c4ddea,
title = "Apples and oranges: Comparing schedule- and contention-based medium access control",
abstract = "Comparison of schedule and contention based MAC protocols is made difficult by their fundamental differences in approach to medium access control. This paper provides a way in which to analyze and compare MAC protocols regardless of their underlying allocation strategy. To that end a framework is developed in which the persistence of any protocol, contention- or schedule-based, can be measured. The framework is used to measure and compare the persistence levels of two prototypical contention- and schedule-based MACs, IEEE 802.11 and Scheduled p-Persistence. An ideal persistence that provides lexicographically max-min fair access to the channel is characterized, and used as a bandwidth allocation scheme. In addition to reducing the unfairness, simulations employing the ideal persistence values show increased throughput and decreased delay and drop rate when compared to either Scheduled p-Persistence or IEEE 802.11.",
keywords = "contention, medium access control, persistence, schedule",
author = "Jonathan Lutz and Charles Colbourn and Violet Syrotiuk",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.1145/1868521.1868573",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9781450302746",
pages = "319--326",
booktitle = "MSWiM'10 - Proceedings of the 13th ACM International Conference on Modeling, Analysis, and Simulation of Wireless and Mobile Systems",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Apples and oranges

T2 - Comparing schedule- and contention-based medium access control

AU - Lutz, Jonathan

AU - Colbourn, Charles

AU - Syrotiuk, Violet

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - Comparison of schedule and contention based MAC protocols is made difficult by their fundamental differences in approach to medium access control. This paper provides a way in which to analyze and compare MAC protocols regardless of their underlying allocation strategy. To that end a framework is developed in which the persistence of any protocol, contention- or schedule-based, can be measured. The framework is used to measure and compare the persistence levels of two prototypical contention- and schedule-based MACs, IEEE 802.11 and Scheduled p-Persistence. An ideal persistence that provides lexicographically max-min fair access to the channel is characterized, and used as a bandwidth allocation scheme. In addition to reducing the unfairness, simulations employing the ideal persistence values show increased throughput and decreased delay and drop rate when compared to either Scheduled p-Persistence or IEEE 802.11.

AB - Comparison of schedule and contention based MAC protocols is made difficult by their fundamental differences in approach to medium access control. This paper provides a way in which to analyze and compare MAC protocols regardless of their underlying allocation strategy. To that end a framework is developed in which the persistence of any protocol, contention- or schedule-based, can be measured. The framework is used to measure and compare the persistence levels of two prototypical contention- and schedule-based MACs, IEEE 802.11 and Scheduled p-Persistence. An ideal persistence that provides lexicographically max-min fair access to the channel is characterized, and used as a bandwidth allocation scheme. In addition to reducing the unfairness, simulations employing the ideal persistence values show increased throughput and decreased delay and drop rate when compared to either Scheduled p-Persistence or IEEE 802.11.

KW - contention

KW - medium access control

KW - persistence

KW - schedule

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=78650213442&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=78650213442&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1145/1868521.1868573

DO - 10.1145/1868521.1868573

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:78650213442

SN - 9781450302746

SP - 319

EP - 326

BT - MSWiM'10 - Proceedings of the 13th ACM International Conference on Modeling, Analysis, and Simulation of Wireless and Mobile Systems

ER -