Antagonism between local dispersal and self-incompatibility systems in a continuous plant population

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many self-incompatible plant species exist in continuous populations in which individuals disperse locally. Local dispersal of pollen and seeds facilitates inbreeding because pollen pools are likely to contain relatives. Self-incompatibility promotes outbreeding because relatives are likely to carry incompatible alleles. Therefore, populations can experience an antagonism between these forces. In this study, a novel computational model is used to explore the effects of this antagonism on gene flow, allelic diversity, neighbourhood sizes, and identity by descent. I confirm that this antagonism is sensitive to dispersal levels and linkage. However, the results suggest that there is little to no difference between the effects of gametophytic and sporophytic self-incompatibility systems (GSI and SSI) on unlinked loci. More importantly, both GSI and SSI affect unlinked loci in a manner similar to obligate outcrossing without mating types. This suggests that the primary evolutionary impact of self-incompatibility systems may be to prevent selfing, and prevention of biparental inbreeding might be a beneficial side-effect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2327-2336
Number of pages10
JournalMolecular Ecology
Volume18
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

self incompatibility
Inbreeding
antagonism
Pollen
inbreeding
Seed Dispersal
pollen flow
outbreeding
loci
Gene Flow
pollen
outcrossing
seed dispersal
selfing
Population
linkage (genetics)
gene flow
adverse effects
Alleles
autogamy

Keywords

  • Genetic structure
  • Isolation by distance
  • Local dispersal
  • Neighbourhood size
  • Recombination
  • Self-incompatibility

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Genetics

Cite this

Antagonism between local dispersal and self-incompatibility systems in a continuous plant population. / Cartwright, Reed.

In: Molecular Ecology, Vol. 18, No. 11, 06.2009, p. 2327-2336.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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