Annual review of anthropology: Developments in American archaeology: Fifty years of the national historic preservation act

Francis Pierce-McManamon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Since its enactment over five decades ago, theNational Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) and the organizations, policies, and regulations implementing it have strongly influenced how archaeology is conducted in the United States. The NHPA created a national network of archaeologists in government agencies. This network reviews the possible impact on important archaeological resources of tens of thousands of public projects planned each year. These reviews often include investigations, of which there have been millions. The archaeological profession has shifted from one oriented mainly on academic research and teaching to one focused on field investigations, planning, resource management, public outreach, and resource protection, bundled under the term cultural resource management (CRM). Since 1966, growth has produced good outcomes aswell as sometroubling developments. Current and new challenges include avoiding lock-step, overly bureaucratic procedures and finding the financial, professional, and technical resources, as well as political support, to build on the achievements so far.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)553-574
Number of pages22
JournalAnnual Review of Anthropology
Volume47
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 21 2018

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archaeology
anthropology
resources
Implementing Regulations
political support
public management
government agency
profession
act
Anthropology
Resources
Archaeology
Historic Preservation
Annual Review
American Archaeology
planning
Teaching
management
Planning
Cultural Resource Management

Keywords

  • Archaeology and the law
  • CRM
  • Cultural resource management
  • History of archaeology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Anthropology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Annual review of anthropology : Developments in American archaeology: Fifty years of the national historic preservation act. / Pierce-McManamon, Francis.

In: Annual Review of Anthropology, Vol. 47, 21.10.2018, p. 553-574.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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