An Experimental Assessment of Public Ownership and Performance: Comparing perceptions in East Asia and the United States

Richard M. Walker, Gene A. Brewer, Barry Bozeman, M. Jae Moon, Jiannan Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

An experimental research design is adopted to explore the potential impact of cultural differences in East Asia and the United States on perceptions of public ownership and governmental performance (efficiency, equity, and probity). While passionate debate has influenced governments on the merits of public or private organizations' delivery of public services, the empirical evidence remains ambivalent. Similarly, argument on societal and regional cultures suggests differences within East Asia as compared to the United States, but evidence is scant. Masters of Public Administration students in China, Hong Kong, South Korea, and the United States rated vignettes of organizations classified as public, private, or unknown ownership against key dimensions of performance. Findings indicate few public ownership and limited country differences, but a consistency in the rating of vignettes, suggesting convergence. The implications of these findings for the study of public management are considered in conclusion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1208-1228
Number of pages21
JournalPublic Management Review
Volume15
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

Keywords

  • East-West differences
  • Public ownership
  • experimental methods
  • performance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Management Information Systems
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'An Experimental Assessment of Public Ownership and Performance: Comparing perceptions in East Asia and the United States'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this