Adsorption of HOx on aerosol surfaces

implications for the atmosphere of Mars

Ariel Anbar, M. T. Leu, H. A. Nair, Y. L. Yung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We find that adsorption of HO2 on dust (γHO2≥0.01), or ice near 30 km (γHO2 ≥0.1), can deplete OH abundances in the lower atmosphere by 10% or more. Such depletions approach those obtained by lowering the water vapor abundance by an order of magnitude below the global average observed by Viking (~ 25%). Since the oxidation of CO is catalyzed by HOx in the lower atmosphere via the reaction CO + OH → CO2 + H, loss of OH due to adsorption of HO2 on dust or ice at low altitudes could have a significant effect on the ratio CO:CO2. The adsorption of H on ice at 50 km (γH≥ 0.01) can result in even larger OH depletions. However, this effect is localized to altitudes >40 km, where CO oxidation is relatively unimportant. Laboratory data suggest that γHO2 ~ 0.01 is a reasonable estimate for adsorption on dust. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research
Volume98
Issue numberE6
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

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Carbon Monoxide
Aerosols
mars
Mars
aerosols
Ice
aerosol
adsorption
Dust
Adsorption
atmospheres
ice
lower atmosphere
atmosphere
dust
depletion
oxidation
Oxidation
low altitude
Steam

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Adsorption of HOx on aerosol surfaces : implications for the atmosphere of Mars. / Anbar, Ariel; Leu, M. T.; Nair, H. A.; Yung, Y. L.

In: Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 98, No. E6, 1993.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T2 - implications for the atmosphere of Mars

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AU - Leu, M. T.

AU - Nair, H. A.

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AB - We find that adsorption of HO2 on dust (γHO2≥0.01), or ice near 30 km (γHO2 ≥0.1), can deplete OH abundances in the lower atmosphere by 10% or more. Such depletions approach those obtained by lowering the water vapor abundance by an order of magnitude below the global average observed by Viking (~ 25%). Since the oxidation of CO is catalyzed by HOx in the lower atmosphere via the reaction CO + OH → CO2 + H, loss of OH due to adsorption of HO2 on dust or ice at low altitudes could have a significant effect on the ratio CO:CO2. The adsorption of H on ice at 50 km (γH≥ 0.01) can result in even larger OH depletions. However, this effect is localized to altitudes >40 km, where CO oxidation is relatively unimportant. Laboratory data suggest that γHO2 ~ 0.01 is a reasonable estimate for adsorption on dust. -from Authors

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