Adolescent Sleep Duration, Variability, and Peak Levels of Achievement and Mental Health

Andrew J. Fuligni, Erin H. Arruda, Jennifer L. Krull, Nancy Gonzales

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To inform public health recommendations for adolescent sleep, the amounts of sleep associated with the highest levels of academic achievement and mental health were examined. The degree to which daily variability in sleep duration represents an underappreciated but functionally significant sleep behavior also was tested. A total of 421 adolescents (Mage = 15.03 years) with Mexican-American backgrounds reported nightly sleep times for 2 weeks; approximately 80% repeated the same protocol 1 year later. Multilevel modeling indicated that the amount of sleep associated with the lowest levels of internalizing and externalizing symptoms was more than 1 hr greater than the amount associated with the highest levels of academic performance. Greater daily variability in sleep duration predicted greater symptomatology and mixed academic outcomes. Child Development

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalChild Development
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

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sleep
Health Status
Mental Health
Sleep
mental health
adolescent
Child Development
academic achievement
Public Health
public health
performance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Adolescent Sleep Duration, Variability, and Peak Levels of Achievement and Mental Health. / Fuligni, Andrew J.; Arruda, Erin H.; Krull, Jennifer L.; Gonzales, Nancy.

In: Child Development, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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