A social media intervention to improve nutrition knowledge and behaviors of low income, pregnant adolescents and adult women

Kiley B. Vander Wyst, Megan E. Vercelli, Kimberly O. O'Brien, Elizabeth M. Cooper, Eva K. Pressman, Corrie M. Whisner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Pregnant adolescents are at increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes compared to adult women, necessitating a need for early and comprehensive health care. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a social media intervention (i.e. weekly prenatal health messages) on improving diet quality, and health beliefs and knowledge. Participants (10 adolescents and 12 adults) completed pre-post intervention interviews, nutrition knowledge and health belief questionnaires, and 24-hour diet recalls. Participants entering pregnancy as overweight or obese were more likely to experience excessive GWG during the intervention. The adults had greater participation during the study despite high levels of social media access among both groups. Participants were able to identify sugar-sweetened foods and acknowledged the benefits of whole grains; however, overall knowledge of MyPlate Guidelines was limited. Social media-based education was well received by participants but did not result in large changes in dietary intake and knowledge. Although larger studies are needed, social media appears to have the potential to reach high-risk women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0223120
JournalPloS one
Volume14
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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pregnant adolescents
Social Media
nutrition knowledge
social networks
Nutrition
income
health beliefs
Health
Comprehensive Health Care
Diet
Health care
Sugars
pregnancy outcome
diet recall
whole grain foods
nutritional adequacy
Pregnancy Outcome
Education
health services
food intake

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

Cite this

A social media intervention to improve nutrition knowledge and behaviors of low income, pregnant adolescents and adult women. / Vander Wyst, Kiley B.; Vercelli, Megan E.; O'Brien, Kimberly O.; Cooper, Elizabeth M.; Pressman, Eva K.; Whisner, Corrie M.

In: PloS one, Vol. 14, No. 10, e0223120, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vander Wyst, Kiley B. ; Vercelli, Megan E. ; O'Brien, Kimberly O. ; Cooper, Elizabeth M. ; Pressman, Eva K. ; Whisner, Corrie M. / A social media intervention to improve nutrition knowledge and behaviors of low income, pregnant adolescents and adult women. In: PloS one. 2019 ; Vol. 14, No. 10.
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