A review of anomaly detection in automated surveillance

Angela Sodemann, Matthew P. Ross, Brett J. Borghetti

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    82 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    As surveillance becomes ubiquitous, the amount of data to be processed grows along with the demand for manpower to interpret the data. A key goal of surveillance is to detect behaviors that can be considered anomalous. As a result, an extensive body of research in automated surveillance has been developed, often with the goal of automatic detection of anomalies. Research into anomaly detection in automated surveillance covers a wide range of domains, employing a vast array of techniques. This review presents an overview of recent research approaches on the topic of anomaly detection in automated surveillance. The reviewed studies are analyzed across five aspects: surveillance target, anomaly definitions and assumptions, types of sensors used and the feature extraction processes, learning methods, and modeling algorithms.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Article number6392472
    Pages (from-to)1257-1272
    Number of pages16
    JournalIEEE Transactions on Systems, Man and Cybernetics Part C: Applications and Reviews
    Volume42
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2012

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    Feature extraction
    Sensors

    Keywords

    • Abnormal behavior
    • anomaly detection
    • automated surveillance
    • behavior classification
    • machine learning

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Control and Systems Engineering
    • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
    • Computer Science Applications
    • Human-Computer Interaction
    • Information Systems
    • Software

    Cite this

    A review of anomaly detection in automated surveillance. / Sodemann, Angela; Ross, Matthew P.; Borghetti, Brett J.

    In: IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man and Cybernetics Part C: Applications and Reviews, Vol. 42, No. 6, 6392472, 2012, p. 1257-1272.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Sodemann, Angela ; Ross, Matthew P. ; Borghetti, Brett J. / A review of anomaly detection in automated surveillance. In: IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man and Cybernetics Part C: Applications and Reviews. 2012 ; Vol. 42, No. 6. pp. 1257-1272.
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