A Randomized Controlled Trial of A Theory-Based Concussion Education Video for NCAA Division I Athletes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A large body of research demonstrates that concussions are exceedingly common and extremely difficult to detect. Despite medical efforts to develop sophisticated tools to detect concussions, research continues to demonstrate that proper detection relies on prompt and thorough symptom reporting from the injured athlete. In the context of sports, such reporting requirements are complicated by systems that reward athletic performance. This study seeks to provide student athletes who play NCAA Division I high-contact sports with a theoretically driven intervention to improve their attitudes and behavior toward concussion reporting. Division I student athletes (N = 345) viewed one of three conditions: an NCAA handout consistent with current practices, the experimental video, or a non-treatment control video, then responded to questions regarding attitudes and behaviors toward concussion reporting. Overall, results support the video’s effectiveness in changing perceptions of concussion injuries. Nuances of the findings lead to a discussion for practical implications to transform concussion-reporting attitudes and behaviors among athletes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHealth Communication
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Communication

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