A Population Based Study of Seasonality of Skin and Soft Tissue Infections

Implications for the Spread of CA-MRSA

Xiaoxia Wang, Sherry Towers, Sarada Panchanathan, Gerardo Chowell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is currently a major cause of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) in the United States. Seasonal variation of MRSA infections in hospital settings has been widely observed. However, systematic time-series analysis of incidence data is desirable to understand the seasonality of community acquired (CA)-MRSA infections at the population level. In this paper, using data on monthly SSTI incidence in children aged 0-19 years and enrolled in Medicaid in Maricopa County, Arizona, from January 2005 to December 2008, we carried out time-series and nonlinear regression analysis to determine the periodicity, trend, and peak timing in SSTI incidence in children at different age: 0-4 years, 5-9 years, 10-14 years, and 15-19 years. We also assessed the temporal correlation between SSTI incidence and meteorological variables including average temperature and humidity. Our analysis revealed a strong annual seasonal pattern of SSTI incidence with peak occurring in early September. This pattern was consistent across age groups. Moreover, SSTIs followed a significantly increasing trend over the 4-year study period with annual incidence increasing from 3.36% to 5.55% in our pediatric population of approximately 290,000. We also found a significant correlation between the temporal variation in SSTI incidence and mean temperature and specific humidity. Our findings could have potential implications on prevention and control efforts against CA-MRSA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere60872
JournalPLoS One
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2 2013

Fingerprint

Soft Tissue Infections
Methicillin
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
angle of incidence
Skin
Tissue
Incidence
infection
Population
Humidity
Atmospheric humidity
time series analysis
humidity
seasonal variation
Pediatrics
Time series analysis
cross infection
Temperature
Regression analysis
Medicaid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

A Population Based Study of Seasonality of Skin and Soft Tissue Infections : Implications for the Spread of CA-MRSA. / Wang, Xiaoxia; Towers, Sherry; Panchanathan, Sarada; Chowell, Gerardo.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 8, No. 4, e60872, 02.04.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, Xiaoxia ; Towers, Sherry ; Panchanathan, Sarada ; Chowell, Gerardo. / A Population Based Study of Seasonality of Skin and Soft Tissue Infections : Implications for the Spread of CA-MRSA. In: PLoS One. 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 4.
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