A novel hollow-fibre membrane biofilm reactor for autohydrogenotrophic denitrification of drinking water

K. C. Lee, Bruce Rittmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

109 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A novel hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor (HFMBR) was developed to remove nitrate from contaminated drinking water using molecular hydrogen as a clean electron-donor substrate. The hollow fibers were sealed on one end and were pressurized with hydrogen on the other end. The counter-diffusion transfer of nitrate and hydrogen allowed 100% hydrogen transfer efficiency into the biofilm and achieved up to 99.9% hydrogen-utilization efficiency for denitrification. Partial denitrification met regulatory standards for nitrate and nitrite at the same time that relatively high steady-state nitrate fluxes (0.08 and 0.1 mg N/cm2-d) were achieved with liquid-phase hydrogen concentrations (0.009 and 0.07 mg H2/l) magnitudes lower than in previous studies. The low frequency of fiber-to-fiber contact in the upflowing liquid established good biofilm accumulation. The specific biofilm detachment rates were between 0.015 and 0.017 day-1, which attained biofilm thickness up to 179 μm. Finally, DOC and BDOC analyses showed that the DOC was increased, while the effluent BDOC was 0.5 mg/l.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)219-226
Number of pages8
JournalWater Science and Technology
Volume41
Issue number4-5
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Denitrification
Biofilms
Potable water
biofilm
denitrification
drinking water
hydrogen
membrane
Membranes
Hydrogen
Fibers
Nitrates
nitrate
liquid
Liquids
Contacts (fluid mechanics)
nitrite
fibre
reactor
Effluents

Keywords

  • Autotrophy
  • BDOC
  • Denitrification
  • Drinking water
  • Hollow fiber
  • Hydrogen
  • Membrane
  • Nitrate
  • Nitrite

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Water Science and Technology

Cite this

A novel hollow-fibre membrane biofilm reactor for autohydrogenotrophic denitrification of drinking water. / Lee, K. C.; Rittmann, Bruce.

In: Water Science and Technology, Vol. 41, No. 4-5, 2000, p. 219-226.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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