A high resolution and continuous isotopic speleothem record of paleoclimate and paleoenvironment from 90 to 53 ka from Pinnacle Point on the south coast of South Africa

Miryam Bar-Matthews, Curtis Marean, Zenobia Jacobs, Panagiotis Karkanas, Erich C. Fisher, Andy I R Herries, Kyle Brown, Hope M. Williams, Jocelyn Bernatchez, Avner Ayalon, Peter J. Nilssen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

119 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Coastal South Africa draws interdisciplinary interests due to the co-occurrence of a rich record for early human behavioral modernity, hyper-diverse vegetation with very high endemism (the Cape Floral Region), and globally influential oceanic and climate systems. High resolution and continuous climate and environmental records are needed to provide the context for the evolution of behavioral modernity and this diverse flora. Here we present the first such record for climate and environmental change from 90 000 to 53 000 years ago from the southern Cape coast. This important time span covers a burst of expression of several indicators of human behavioral modernity, as well as several key cycles in global climate change. Our research location is ideally placed near the location of several critical archaeological sites, near the boundary of the winter and summer rainfall regimes, and close to isotopically distinct floral zones. We used isotopic analysis of precisely dated speleothems to document shifting vegetation and rainfall, and show that the presence of winter rain and C3 grasses waxes and wanes in response to Southern Hemisphere shifts in SSTs and global temperature. When proxies of global temperatures indicate warmer conditions, δ18O and δ13C indicate more winter rain and more C3 grasses, respectively, and vice versa. This record displays abrupt and short-term changes previously undocumented. It is often argued that the Cape Floral Region partially owes its high diversity to relative climatic stability. Our record shows isotopic variability that at least matches that displayed in the Levantine Mediterranean system, so climatic stability may not have characterized the south coast. One short-lived phase of human technological innovation (the Still Bay) associated with early evidence for behavioral modernity occurs synchronous with an abrupt environmental perturbation. Early modern humans in this region confronted a variable climate and adapted quickly in a manner similar to behaviorally modern humans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2131-2145
Number of pages15
JournalQuaternary Science Reviews
Volume29
Issue number17-18
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2010

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speleothem
paleoenvironment
paleoclimate
modernity
South Africa
climate
coasts
coast
rain
location research
winter
grass
grasses
technical innovation
rainfall
climate change
vegetation
isotopic analysis
endemism
wax

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geology
  • Global and Planetary Change
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

A high resolution and continuous isotopic speleothem record of paleoclimate and paleoenvironment from 90 to 53 ka from Pinnacle Point on the south coast of South Africa. / Bar-Matthews, Miryam; Marean, Curtis; Jacobs, Zenobia; Karkanas, Panagiotis; Fisher, Erich C.; Herries, Andy I R; Brown, Kyle; Williams, Hope M.; Bernatchez, Jocelyn; Ayalon, Avner; Nilssen, Peter J.

In: Quaternary Science Reviews, Vol. 29, No. 17-18, 08.2010, p. 2131-2145.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bar-Matthews, M, Marean, C, Jacobs, Z, Karkanas, P, Fisher, EC, Herries, AIR, Brown, K, Williams, HM, Bernatchez, J, Ayalon, A & Nilssen, PJ 2010, 'A high resolution and continuous isotopic speleothem record of paleoclimate and paleoenvironment from 90 to 53 ka from Pinnacle Point on the south coast of South Africa', Quaternary Science Reviews, vol. 29, no. 17-18, pp. 2131-2145. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.quascirev.2010.05.009
Bar-Matthews, Miryam ; Marean, Curtis ; Jacobs, Zenobia ; Karkanas, Panagiotis ; Fisher, Erich C. ; Herries, Andy I R ; Brown, Kyle ; Williams, Hope M. ; Bernatchez, Jocelyn ; Ayalon, Avner ; Nilssen, Peter J. / A high resolution and continuous isotopic speleothem record of paleoclimate and paleoenvironment from 90 to 53 ka from Pinnacle Point on the south coast of South Africa. In: Quaternary Science Reviews. 2010 ; Vol. 29, No. 17-18. pp. 2131-2145.
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abstract = "Coastal South Africa draws interdisciplinary interests due to the co-occurrence of a rich record for early human behavioral modernity, hyper-diverse vegetation with very high endemism (the Cape Floral Region), and globally influential oceanic and climate systems. High resolution and continuous climate and environmental records are needed to provide the context for the evolution of behavioral modernity and this diverse flora. Here we present the first such record for climate and environmental change from 90 000 to 53 000 years ago from the southern Cape coast. This important time span covers a burst of expression of several indicators of human behavioral modernity, as well as several key cycles in global climate change. Our research location is ideally placed near the location of several critical archaeological sites, near the boundary of the winter and summer rainfall regimes, and close to isotopically distinct floral zones. We used isotopic analysis of precisely dated speleothems to document shifting vegetation and rainfall, and show that the presence of winter rain and C3 grasses waxes and wanes in response to Southern Hemisphere shifts in SSTs and global temperature. When proxies of global temperatures indicate warmer conditions, δ18O and δ13C indicate more winter rain and more C3 grasses, respectively, and vice versa. This record displays abrupt and short-term changes previously undocumented. It is often argued that the Cape Floral Region partially owes its high diversity to relative climatic stability. Our record shows isotopic variability that at least matches that displayed in the Levantine Mediterranean system, so climatic stability may not have characterized the south coast. One short-lived phase of human technological innovation (the Still Bay) associated with early evidence for behavioral modernity occurs synchronous with an abrupt environmental perturbation. Early modern humans in this region confronted a variable climate and adapted quickly in a manner similar to behaviorally modern humans.",
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