Design and Implementation of a Soft Synergy-Based Hand for Prosthetic Applications

Project: Research project

Project Details

Description

Design and Implementation of a Soft Synergy-Based Hand for Prosthetic Applications Design and Implementation of a Soft Synergy-Based Hand for Prosthetic Applications Abstract The human hand is critically important for performance of many activities of daily living (ADL), including self-feeding, dressing, hygiene, tool use, and recreation. Therefore, loss of the hand due to traumatic injury or disease significantly challenges individuals in their ability to perform ADL, work, and overall quality of life. Despite advances in hand prostheses design and research, several barriers remain against widespread acceptance of prosthetic hands by amputees, including their limited functionality and comfort, high cost, poor aesthetic appearance, durability, and lack of sensory feedback. We propose to design and test a new prosthetic hand by modifying an artificial hand designed by the University of Pisa and the Italian Institute of Technology (IIT) for robotic applications, the SoftHand (SH). The Pisa/IIT SH design simplifies the control of robotic grasping by combining underactuation (number of motors< number of joints) and soft synergies (constrained motion at multiple joints), but it is not suitable for prosthetic applications. This Seed Grant will support (a) design modifications to the Pisa/IIT SH, (b) testing myoelectric control and force feedback capabilities on a wide range of grasping and manipulation tasks on intact individuals and amputees, and (c) generation of pilot data in support of an NIH R01 proposal. The R01 proposal will pursue the design and building of a low-cost and high-performance hand prosthesis with superior capabilities and acceptance relative to todays commercially available hand prostheses.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date5/16/145/15/18

Funding

  • ASU: Mayo Seed Grant: $390,147.00

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