Youth Migration and Labour Constraints in African Agrarian Households

Valerie Mueller, Cheryl Doss, Agnes Quisumbing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using panel data from Ethiopia and Malawi, we investigate how youth migration affects household labour, hired labour demand, and income, and whether these effects vary by migrant sex and destination. Labour shortages arise from the migration of a head’s child. However, the migration of the head’s sons produces a greater burden, particularly on female heads/spouses (in Ethiopia) and brothers (in Malawi). Gains from migration in the form of increased total net income justify the increased labour efforts in Ethiopia. Weaker evidence suggests households in Malawi substitute hired for migrant family labour at the expense of total household net income.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)875-894
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Development Studies
Volume54
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 4 2018

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Malawi
Ethiopia
labor
migration
income
migrant
labor demand
spouse
shortage
panel data
youth
household
evidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Development

Cite this

Youth Migration and Labour Constraints in African Agrarian Households. / Mueller, Valerie; Doss, Cheryl; Quisumbing, Agnes.

In: Journal of Development Studies, Vol. 54, No. 5, 04.05.2018, p. 875-894.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mueller, Valerie ; Doss, Cheryl ; Quisumbing, Agnes. / Youth Migration and Labour Constraints in African Agrarian Households. In: Journal of Development Studies. 2018 ; Vol. 54, No. 5. pp. 875-894.
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