Yours, mine, and ours: Mutual attributions for nonverbal behaviors in couples' interactions

Valerie Manusov, Kory Floyd, Jeff Kerssen-Griep

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this article, we argue that nonverbal cues act much like other behaviors in triggering attribution making in couples' interactions. In a test of this contention with 60 couples, we found that negative behaviors were more likely than positive nonverbal cues to be noticed, satisfaction was related to attributions for positive behaviors, mutual attributions for the same behaviors differed significantly, and self-other attributional differences were enhanced by relational satisfaction. These results extend previous applications of attribution theory by providing some validation for the use of attribution theories with nonverbal behaviors and by showing that attribution making occurs in a way that reflects the mutually occurring, dyadic level of interpersonal communication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)234-260
Number of pages27
JournalCommunication Research
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Communication
  • Linguistics and Language

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