Young children's adjustment to chronic family adversity

A longitudinal study of low-income families

Daniel S. Shaw, Emily Winslow, Elizabeth B. Owens, Nancy Hood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To test the relation between multiple family stressors and young children's adjustment problems. Method: Longitudinal data were collected on 300 low-income, ethnically diverse, male subjects beginning during infancy and followed until age 31/2. Results: General support was found for the family stressor hypothesis. Stressor groups at 18 and 24 months predicted Child Behavior Checklist Externalizing and Internalizing factors at 24 and 42 months, including clinically elevated problems. Conclusions: The results confirm and extend previous investigations of the family stressor hypothesis. They suggest that psychological evaluations of young children need to be ecologically based, including intra- and extrafamilial factors that appear to cumulatively increase risk of behavior problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)545-553
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume37
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Social Adjustment
Longitudinal Studies
Child Behavior
Risk-Taking
Checklist
Psychology

Keywords

  • Child psychopathology
  • Externalizing problems
  • Family adversity
  • Infancy
  • Preschool children

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Young children's adjustment to chronic family adversity : A longitudinal study of low-income families. / Shaw, Daniel S.; Winslow, Emily; Owens, Elizabeth B.; Hood, Nancy.

In: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Vol. 37, No. 5, 05.1998, p. 545-553.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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