“You excluded us for so long and now you want us to be patriotic?”: African American Women Teachers Navigating the Quandary of Citizenship

Amanda Vickery

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

This qualitative study focuses on how 5 African American women social studies teachers utilized their experiential knowledge and understanding of history to make sense of the construct of citizenship. Drawing from Black feminism, this study asks how African American women social studies teachers define and teach the construct of citizenship. Multiple intersections of the participants’ identities impacted the ways in which they understood and taught citizenship to their students. Because traditional notions of citizenship failed to align with their experiences as African American women, they reinterpreted citizenship as based within their respective communities through the creation of “free spaces.” These transformative views of citizenship provide a framework into how complex perspectives on citizenship are being enacted within social studies classrooms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-31
Number of pages31
JournalTheory and Research in Social Education
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Feb 16 2017

Keywords

  • African American women teachers
  • Black feminism
  • citizenship education
  • community

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Sociology and Political Science

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