Would an Obese Person Whistle Vivaldi? Targets of Prejudice Self-Present to Minimize Appearance of Specific Threats

Rebecca Neel, Samantha L. Neufeld, Steven Neuberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

How do targets of stigma manage social interactions? We built from a threat-specific model of prejudice to predict that targets select impression-management strategies that address the particular threats other people see them to pose. We recruited participants from two groups perceived to pose different threats: overweight people, who are heuristically associated with disease and targeted with disgust, and Black men, who are perceived to be dangerous and targeted with fear. When stereotypes and prejudices toward their groups were made salient, overweight people (Studies 1 and 2) and Black men (Study 2) selectively prioritized self-presentation strategies to minimize apparent disease threat (wearing clean clothes) or physical-violence threat (smiling), respectively. The specific threat a group is seen to pose plays an important but underexamined role in the psychology of being a target of prejudice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)678-687
Number of pages10
JournalPsychological Science
Volume24
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2013

Fingerprint

Smiling
Clothing
Interpersonal Relations
Fear
Psychology
Person
Prejudice
Threat
Physical Abuse
Physical
Stereotypes
Impression Management
Stigma
Social Interaction
Clothes
Disgust
Self-presentation
Salient

Keywords

  • minority groups
  • prejudice
  • racial and ethnic attitudes and relations
  • threat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Would an Obese Person Whistle Vivaldi? Targets of Prejudice Self-Present to Minimize Appearance of Specific Threats. / Neel, Rebecca; Neufeld, Samantha L.; Neuberg, Steven.

In: Psychological Science, Vol. 24, No. 5, 05.2013, p. 678-687.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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