Work‐Unit Structure and Processes and Job‐Related Stressors as Predictors of Managerial Burnout

Raymond T. Lee, Blake Ashforth

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20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Research on the antecedents of burnout has focused largely on such job‐related stressors as role conflict, ambiguity, and overload. The present study expands the focus by also examining the role of organizational structure and processes, notably work‐unit standardization, formalization, and communication. It is hypothesized that the effect of organizational structure and processes on burnout is in fact largely mediated by job‐related stressors. Self‐report data from supervisors and managers in a public welfare setting provide strong support. More broadly, these findings suggest that the impact of “macro” variables on the individual is at least partially mediated by “micro” variables. Specific associations between aspects of structure/process and stressors and between stressors and dimensions of burnout are also examined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1831-1847
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume21
Issue number22
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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Work‐Unit Structure and Processes and Job‐Related Stressors as Predictors of Managerial Burnout. / Lee, Raymond T.; Ashforth, Blake.

In: Journal of Applied Social Psychology, Vol. 21, No. 22, 1991, p. 1831-1847.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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