Workshops vs. tutoring

How ASU's minority engineering program is changing the way engineering students learn

J. K. Adair, M. A. Reyes, M. R. Anderson-Rowland, D. A. Kouris

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

For the past five years, the Minority Engineering Program in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Arizona State University (ASU) has channeled retention efforts through their Academic Excellence Program. This program housed two components: peer tutoring and mentoring and group workshops. While both produced successful retention rates among minority students within the College, both students and faculty strongly expressed a need for a more structured and intensive program to assist engineering students with the more challenging courses. In fall of 2000, ASU's MEP remodeled their efforts at retention and created the Academic Excellence Workshop program. The workshop program replaces tutoring and mentoring programs with weekly workshop sessions. This non-traditional approach to academic support has necessitated a change in paradigm for staff, faculty, and students. The response to this change has been promising. This paper will discuss the AEW program structure and how the workshop concept has been promoted to students and faculty.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference
Volume2
StatePublished - 2001
Event31st Annual Frontiers in Education Conference- Impact on Engineering and Science Education- - Reno, NV, United States
Duration: Oct 10 2001Oct 13 2001

Other

Other31st Annual Frontiers in Education Conference- Impact on Engineering and Science Education-
CountryUnited States
CityReno, NV
Period10/10/0110/13/01

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Students
Technical presentations

Keywords

  • Faculty/student/staff collaboration
  • Group-learning
  • Workshop marketing
  • Workshop session format

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

Adair, J. K., Reyes, M. A., Anderson-Rowland, M. R., & Kouris, D. A. (2001). Workshops vs. tutoring: How ASU's minority engineering program is changing the way engineering students learn. In Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference (Vol. 2)

Workshops vs. tutoring : How ASU's minority engineering program is changing the way engineering students learn. / Adair, J. K.; Reyes, M. A.; Anderson-Rowland, M. R.; Kouris, D. A.

Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference. Vol. 2 2001.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Adair, JK, Reyes, MA, Anderson-Rowland, MR & Kouris, DA 2001, Workshops vs. tutoring: How ASU's minority engineering program is changing the way engineering students learn. in Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference. vol. 2, 31st Annual Frontiers in Education Conference- Impact on Engineering and Science Education-, Reno, NV, United States, 10/10/01.
Adair JK, Reyes MA, Anderson-Rowland MR, Kouris DA. Workshops vs. tutoring: How ASU's minority engineering program is changing the way engineering students learn. In Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference. Vol. 2. 2001
Adair, J. K. ; Reyes, M. A. ; Anderson-Rowland, M. R. ; Kouris, D. A. / Workshops vs. tutoring : How ASU's minority engineering program is changing the way engineering students learn. Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference. Vol. 2 2001.
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