Workload of Social Work Academics and Factors That Contribute to Time Spent on Research

Barbra Teater, Natasha Mendoza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study delineated academic work type and time by examining data from a cross-sectional survey of social work academics (N=392) in relation to their perception of universities’ expectations of workload, actual workload, and factors that contribute to time spent on research. Findings revealed a disconnect between what academics perceived universities expected of them and the actual amount of time they spent on teaching, service, and research. Holding a PhD, teaching fewer classes, and being employed by a university with a PhD program explained 32% of the variance in academics’ time spent on research. The findings point to the need to rebalance the workload expectations across teaching, service, and research. Strategies for supporting workload requirements are provided.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)250-260
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Social Work Education
Volume54
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 3 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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