Working with engineered nanomaterials

Towards developing safe work practices

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Nanotechnology has been hailed as the next technological revolution and is poised to impact on every aspect of our lives. Through the manipulation of matter at near-atomic scales, the technology is enabling remarkable progress in many fields to produce new materials, structures and devices with unique and truly innovative properties. Although predominantly at the laboratory and pre-commercial stage, nanotechnology-based commercial products are already available, ranging from cosmetics to stain-resistant clothing. The future promises significant advances in areas as diverse as next-generation electronics, high efficiency energy conversion and storage, novel sensors and advanced medical diagnostics. As with all new technologies, exploiting the unique behavior of nanomaterials and devices also introduces the potential for unique and unforeseen health impacts. The successful and responsible development of nanotechnology is dependent on minimizing the health risk to workers and others, while maintaining public confidence in the technology. This is a daunting task, and not one that can be undertaken lightly or in isolation, critical element is the development of appropriate working procedures and strategies that reduce the potential for harmful health impact. Although current information on nanomaterial exposure, toxicity and control is sparse, we are in a position to begin formulating appropriate ways of working with nanomaterials based on the knowledge we do have at our disposal. This seminar will provide a broad overview of considerations towards developing strategies to ensure safe working practices, from federal government activities underpinning the responsible development of nanotechnology to current research addressing specific issues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2005 AIChE Spring National Meeting, Conference Proceedings
Pages3111
Number of pages1
StatePublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes
Event2005 AIChE Spring National Meeting - Atlanta, GA, United States
Duration: Apr 10 2005Apr 14 2005

Other

Other2005 AIChE Spring National Meeting
CountryUnited States
CityAtlanta, GA
Period4/10/054/14/05

Fingerprint

Nanotechnology
Nanostructured materials
Health
Cosmetics
Health risks
Technical presentations
Energy conversion
Energy storage
Toxicity
Electronic equipment
Sensors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Maynard, A. (2005). Working with engineered nanomaterials: Towards developing safe work practices. In 2005 AIChE Spring National Meeting, Conference Proceedings (pp. 3111)

Working with engineered nanomaterials : Towards developing safe work practices. / Maynard, Andrew.

2005 AIChE Spring National Meeting, Conference Proceedings. 2005. p. 3111.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Maynard, A 2005, Working with engineered nanomaterials: Towards developing safe work practices. in 2005 AIChE Spring National Meeting, Conference Proceedings. pp. 3111, 2005 AIChE Spring National Meeting, Atlanta, GA, United States, 4/10/05.
Maynard A. Working with engineered nanomaterials: Towards developing safe work practices. In 2005 AIChE Spring National Meeting, Conference Proceedings. 2005. p. 3111
Maynard, Andrew. / Working with engineered nanomaterials : Towards developing safe work practices. 2005 AIChE Spring National Meeting, Conference Proceedings. 2005. pp. 3111
@inproceedings{c082670db6804db8be775ffc2186a3c6,
title = "Working with engineered nanomaterials: Towards developing safe work practices",
abstract = "Nanotechnology has been hailed as the next technological revolution and is poised to impact on every aspect of our lives. Through the manipulation of matter at near-atomic scales, the technology is enabling remarkable progress in many fields to produce new materials, structures and devices with unique and truly innovative properties. Although predominantly at the laboratory and pre-commercial stage, nanotechnology-based commercial products are already available, ranging from cosmetics to stain-resistant clothing. The future promises significant advances in areas as diverse as next-generation electronics, high efficiency energy conversion and storage, novel sensors and advanced medical diagnostics. As with all new technologies, exploiting the unique behavior of nanomaterials and devices also introduces the potential for unique and unforeseen health impacts. The successful and responsible development of nanotechnology is dependent on minimizing the health risk to workers and others, while maintaining public confidence in the technology. This is a daunting task, and not one that can be undertaken lightly or in isolation, critical element is the development of appropriate working procedures and strategies that reduce the potential for harmful health impact. Although current information on nanomaterial exposure, toxicity and control is sparse, we are in a position to begin formulating appropriate ways of working with nanomaterials based on the knowledge we do have at our disposal. This seminar will provide a broad overview of considerations towards developing strategies to ensure safe working practices, from federal government activities underpinning the responsible development of nanotechnology to current research addressing specific issues.",
author = "Andrew Maynard",
year = "2005",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "0816909849",
pages = "3111",
booktitle = "2005 AIChE Spring National Meeting, Conference Proceedings",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Working with engineered nanomaterials

T2 - Towards developing safe work practices

AU - Maynard, Andrew

PY - 2005

Y1 - 2005

N2 - Nanotechnology has been hailed as the next technological revolution and is poised to impact on every aspect of our lives. Through the manipulation of matter at near-atomic scales, the technology is enabling remarkable progress in many fields to produce new materials, structures and devices with unique and truly innovative properties. Although predominantly at the laboratory and pre-commercial stage, nanotechnology-based commercial products are already available, ranging from cosmetics to stain-resistant clothing. The future promises significant advances in areas as diverse as next-generation electronics, high efficiency energy conversion and storage, novel sensors and advanced medical diagnostics. As with all new technologies, exploiting the unique behavior of nanomaterials and devices also introduces the potential for unique and unforeseen health impacts. The successful and responsible development of nanotechnology is dependent on minimizing the health risk to workers and others, while maintaining public confidence in the technology. This is a daunting task, and not one that can be undertaken lightly or in isolation, critical element is the development of appropriate working procedures and strategies that reduce the potential for harmful health impact. Although current information on nanomaterial exposure, toxicity and control is sparse, we are in a position to begin formulating appropriate ways of working with nanomaterials based on the knowledge we do have at our disposal. This seminar will provide a broad overview of considerations towards developing strategies to ensure safe working practices, from federal government activities underpinning the responsible development of nanotechnology to current research addressing specific issues.

AB - Nanotechnology has been hailed as the next technological revolution and is poised to impact on every aspect of our lives. Through the manipulation of matter at near-atomic scales, the technology is enabling remarkable progress in many fields to produce new materials, structures and devices with unique and truly innovative properties. Although predominantly at the laboratory and pre-commercial stage, nanotechnology-based commercial products are already available, ranging from cosmetics to stain-resistant clothing. The future promises significant advances in areas as diverse as next-generation electronics, high efficiency energy conversion and storage, novel sensors and advanced medical diagnostics. As with all new technologies, exploiting the unique behavior of nanomaterials and devices also introduces the potential for unique and unforeseen health impacts. The successful and responsible development of nanotechnology is dependent on minimizing the health risk to workers and others, while maintaining public confidence in the technology. This is a daunting task, and not one that can be undertaken lightly or in isolation, critical element is the development of appropriate working procedures and strategies that reduce the potential for harmful health impact. Although current information on nanomaterial exposure, toxicity and control is sparse, we are in a position to begin formulating appropriate ways of working with nanomaterials based on the knowledge we do have at our disposal. This seminar will provide a broad overview of considerations towards developing strategies to ensure safe working practices, from federal government activities underpinning the responsible development of nanotechnology to current research addressing specific issues.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=22444446603&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=22444446603&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Conference contribution

SN - 0816909849

SP - 3111

BT - 2005 AIChE Spring National Meeting, Conference Proceedings

ER -