Women on the frontline: Rebel group ideology and women’s participation in violent rebellion

Reed Wood, Jakana L. Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite the frequent participation of women in armed groups, few studies have sought to explain the variation in their roles across different rebellions. Herein, we investigate this variation. We argue that the political ideology a group adopts plays a central role in determining the extent of women’s participation, particularly their deployment in combat roles. Specifically, we link variations in women’s roles in armed groups to differences in beliefs about gender hierarchies and gender-based divisions of labor inherent in the specific ideologies the groups adopt. We evaluate hypotheses drawn from these arguments using a novel cross-sectional dataset on female combatants in a global sample of rebel organizations active between 1979 and 2009. We find that the presence of a Marxist-oriented ‘leftist’ ideology increases the prevalence of female fighters while Islamist ideologies exert the opposite effect. However, we find little evidence that nationalism exerts an independent influence on women’s combat roles. We also note a general inverse relationship between group religiosity and the prevalence of female fighters. Our analysis demonstrates that political ideology plays a central role in determining whether and to what extent resistance movements incorporate female fighters into their armed wings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-46
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Peace Research
Volume54
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

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ideology
participation
political ideology
Ideologies
Group
resistance movement
women's role
gender
study group
division of labor
Personnel
nationalism
evidence

Keywords

  • female combatants
  • rebel ideology
  • rebellion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Safety Research
  • Political Science and International Relations

Cite this

Women on the frontline : Rebel group ideology and women’s participation in violent rebellion. / Wood, Reed; Thomas, Jakana L.

In: Journal of Peace Research, Vol. 54, No. 1, 2017, p. 31-46.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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