Willingness of Parkinson's disease patients to participate in research using internet-based technology

David Shprecher, Katia Noyes, Kevin Biglan, Dongwen Wang, E. Ray Dorsey, Roger Kurlan, Michael Jacob Adams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Motor impairment and travel time have been shown to be important barriers to recruitment for Parkinson's disease (PD) clinical trials. This study determined whether use of Internet-based video communication for study visits would improve likelihood of participating in PD clinical trials.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS: University of Utah PD clinic patients were invited to complete a survey asking if they would be willing to participate in a hypothetical research study under four different scenarios. McNemar's test was used to test the hypothesis that remote assessments would improve willingness to participate.

RESULTS: Willingness to participate was 101/113 (87%) in the standard scenario. Willingness to participate was highest (93%; p=0.046) with most visits occurring via telemedicine at a local clinic, followed by some visits occurring via telemedicine at a local clinic (91%; p=0.157). Willingness to participate was lower with some (80%; p=0.008) or most (82%; p=0.071) visits occurring by home telemonitoring.

CONCLUSIONS: Use of telemedicine may be an acceptable means to improve participation in clinical trials. This would need to be confirmed with the use of a larger-scale inquiry involving rural populations. Future research should assess subject or caregiver comfort and trainability with respect to computer-based technology in the home and systems barriers for wider implementation of telemedicine in neurology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)684-687
Number of pages4
JournalTelemedicine and e-Health
Volume18
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Telemedicine
Internet
Parkinson Disease
Technology
Clinical Trials
Research
House Calls
Rural Population
Neurology
Caregivers
Communication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Willingness of Parkinson's disease patients to participate in research using internet-based technology. / Shprecher, David; Noyes, Katia; Biglan, Kevin; Wang, Dongwen; Dorsey, E. Ray; Kurlan, Roger; Adams, Michael Jacob.

In: Telemedicine and e-Health, Vol. 18, No. 9, 01.11.2012, p. 684-687.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shprecher, David ; Noyes, Katia ; Biglan, Kevin ; Wang, Dongwen ; Dorsey, E. Ray ; Kurlan, Roger ; Adams, Michael Jacob. / Willingness of Parkinson's disease patients to participate in research using internet-based technology. In: Telemedicine and e-Health. 2012 ; Vol. 18, No. 9. pp. 684-687.
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