Wild primate populations in emerging infectious disease research: The missing link?

Nathan D. Wolfe, Ananias A. Escalante, William B. Karesh, Annelisa Kilbourn, Andrew Spielman, Altaf A. Lal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

145 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Wild primate populations, an unexplored source of information regarding emerging infectious disease, may hold valuable clues to the origins and evolution of some important pathogens. Primates can act as reservoirs for human pathogens. As members of biologically diverse habitats, they serve as sentinels for surveillance of emerging pathogens and provide models for basic research on natural transmission dynamics. Since emerging infectious diseases also pose serious threats to endangered and threatened primate species, studies of these diseases in primate populations can benefit conservation efforts and may provide the missing link between laboratory studies and the well-recognized needs of early disease detection, identification, and surveillance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)149-158
Number of pages10
JournalEmerging Infectious Diseases
Volume4
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Emerging Communicable Diseases
Primates
Primate Diseases
Sentinel Surveillance
Research
Population
Endangered Species
Ecosystem
Early Diagnosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Wolfe, N. D., Escalante, A. A., Karesh, W. B., Kilbourn, A., Spielman, A., & Lal, A. A. (1998). Wild primate populations in emerging infectious disease research: The missing link? Emerging Infectious Diseases, 4(2), 149-158.

Wild primate populations in emerging infectious disease research : The missing link? / Wolfe, Nathan D.; Escalante, Ananias A.; Karesh, William B.; Kilbourn, Annelisa; Spielman, Andrew; Lal, Altaf A.

In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, Vol. 4, No. 2, 1998, p. 149-158.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wolfe, ND, Escalante, AA, Karesh, WB, Kilbourn, A, Spielman, A & Lal, AA 1998, 'Wild primate populations in emerging infectious disease research: The missing link?', Emerging Infectious Diseases, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 149-158.
Wolfe ND, Escalante AA, Karesh WB, Kilbourn A, Spielman A, Lal AA. Wild primate populations in emerging infectious disease research: The missing link? Emerging Infectious Diseases. 1998;4(2):149-158.
Wolfe, Nathan D. ; Escalante, Ananias A. ; Karesh, William B. ; Kilbourn, Annelisa ; Spielman, Andrew ; Lal, Altaf A. / Wild primate populations in emerging infectious disease research : The missing link?. In: Emerging Infectious Diseases. 1998 ; Vol. 4, No. 2. pp. 149-158.
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