Why maps improve memory for text: The influence of structural information on working memory operations

Raymond W. Kulhavy, William A. Stock, Michael P. Verdi, Kent A. Rittschof, Wilhelmina Savenye

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

In order to test how associated verbal and spatial stimuli are processed in memory, undergraduates studied a reference map as either an intact unit or as a series of individual features, and read a text containing facts related to map features. In addition, the map was presented either before or after reading the text. Seeing the intact map prior to the text led to better recall of both map information and facts from the text. These results support a dual coding model, where stimuli such as maps possess a retrieval advantage because they allow simultaneous representation in working memory. This advantage occurs because information from the map can be used to cue retrieval of associated verbal facts, without exceeding the processing constraints of the memorial system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)375-392
Number of pages18
JournalEuropean Journal of Cognitive Psychology
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1993

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

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