Why isn't creativity more important to educational psychologists? Potentials, pitfalls, and future directions in creativity research

Jonathan A. Plucker, Ronald A. Beghetto, Gayle T. Dow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

551 Scopus citations

Abstract

The construct of creativity has a great deal to offer educational psychology. Creativity appears to be an important component of problem-solving and other cognitive abilities, healthy social and emotional well-being, and scholastic and adult success. Yet the study of creativity is not nearly as robust as one would expect, due in part to the preponderance of myths and stereotypes about creativity that collectively strangle most research efforts in this area. The root cause of these stereotypes is the lack of adequate precision in the definition of creativity. The body of the article is devoted to specific suggestions for conceptualizing and defining creativity to maximize its potential contributions to educational psychology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)83-96
Number of pages14
JournalEducational Psychologist
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2004
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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