Why do people trust? Moving toward a more comprehensive consideration of the antecedents of trust

Michael Baer, Jason A. Colquitt

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Why do people trust? Considering the substantial literature on trust, one might initially expect that a single chapter would be unable to adequately review the answers to this question. On closer inspection, however, the answers provided by the literature comprise a very narrow set of answers. Indeed, narrative and meta-analytic reviews of trust have observed that empirical research has been almost entirely limited to exploring just two broad answers to this question - because people have trusting dispositions and because others are trustworthy (Colquitt, Scott, & LePine, 2007; Dirks & Ferrin, 2002; Möllering, 2006). In other words, the literature has reached a consensus that people trust as a result of their dispositional tendencies to rely on the words and deeds of others, and because others demonstrate, in a variety of ways, that they can be relied upon (Mayer, Davis, & Schoorman, 1995).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Routledge Companion to Trust
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages163-182
Number of pages20
ISBN (Electronic)9781317595717
ISBN (Print)9781138817593
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)

Cite this

Baer, M., & Colquitt, J. A. (2017). Why do people trust? Moving toward a more comprehensive consideration of the antecedents of trust. In The Routledge Companion to Trust (pp. 163-182). Taylor and Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315745572