Why aren't there more women in engineering

Can we really do anything?

Mary R. Anderson-Rowland

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Engineering has always included women; however, engineering has never included very many women. Some basic reasons are explored on why women do or do not choose engineering, why they leave engineering, and why the number of women in engineering is not increasing as rapidly as the numbers of women in medicine and law. These topics include: the lack of engineering curriculum in K-12, the lack of a positive public image of engineers, the lack of a vision on what an engineer really is, and the lack of support for women to succeed in engineering. Efforts at Arizona State University to increase the recruitment and retention of women in engineering, computer science, and construction are introduced. Recruitment efforts include summer programs for middle school and high school girls, campus events during the academic year, a Bridge Program for entering freshmen women, Saturday Academies for middle school and high school women, and a program with middle school and high school teachers and counselors to acquaint them with engineering. These participants are helped to develop modules on engineering that will be attractive to young women and that will be incorporated in their science and math classes. Retention programs for college women in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences are also presented. The paper describes lessons learned while developing these programs. How to start and build a program to recruit and to retain women in engineering is examined. Outcomes and results of these efforts are also discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationASEE Annual Conference Proceedings
Pages7295-7307
Number of pages13
StatePublished - 2003
Event2003 ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Staying in Tune with Engineering Education - Nashville, TN, United States
Duration: Jun 22 2003Jun 25 2003

Other

Other2003 ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Staying in Tune with Engineering Education
CountryUnited States
CityNashville, TN
Period6/22/036/25/03

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Engineers
Curricula
Computer science
Medicine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Anderson-Rowland, M. R. (2003). Why aren't there more women in engineering: Can we really do anything? In ASEE Annual Conference Proceedings (pp. 7295-7307)

Why aren't there more women in engineering : Can we really do anything? / Anderson-Rowland, Mary R.

ASEE Annual Conference Proceedings. 2003. p. 7295-7307.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Anderson-Rowland, MR 2003, Why aren't there more women in engineering: Can we really do anything? in ASEE Annual Conference Proceedings. pp. 7295-7307, 2003 ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Staying in Tune with Engineering Education, Nashville, TN, United States, 6/22/03.
Anderson-Rowland MR. Why aren't there more women in engineering: Can we really do anything? In ASEE Annual Conference Proceedings. 2003. p. 7295-7307
Anderson-Rowland, Mary R. / Why aren't there more women in engineering : Can we really do anything?. ASEE Annual Conference Proceedings. 2003. pp. 7295-7307
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