Whose hand on the tiller? Revisiting “spatial statistical analysis and gis”

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Anselin and Getis argue in their 1992 paper “Spatial statistical analysis and GIS” that the development of a toolbox of spatial analytic techniques should be directed by the scientists whose work defines the need for such a toolbox. The field of GIS has changed fundamentally since 1992 as a result of new technical developments, including a general move away from the map as the defining metaphor, the influence of the Internet and the World Wide Web, and changes in the practice of software engineering. Science as a whole has also changed, towards a more collaborative model that is more dependent on computational infrastructure. The impacts of space on the methodology of science are also better understood. The Anselin and Getis paper was remarkably prescient in its identification of the major issues that continue to affect the relationship between spatial analysis and GIS. Institutional issues continue to frame the relationship between GIS and spatial analysis, and are best addressed through partnerships.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAdvances in Spatial Science
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages49-59
Number of pages11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameAdvances in Spatial Science
Volume61
ISSN (Print)1430-9602
ISSN (Electronic)2197-9375

Fingerprint

statistical analysis
Geographical Information System
GIS
spatial analysis
Internet
World Wide Web
technical development
science
metaphor
infrastructure
engineering
software
methodology
Statistical analysis
Spatial analysis
Methodology
Software engineering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

Goodchild, M. (2010). Whose hand on the tiller? Revisiting “spatial statistical analysis and gis”. In Advances in Spatial Science (pp. 49-59). (Advances in Spatial Science; Vol. 61). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-01976-0_4

Whose hand on the tiller? Revisiting “spatial statistical analysis and gis”. / Goodchild, Michael.

Advances in Spatial Science. Springer International Publishing, 2010. p. 49-59 (Advances in Spatial Science; Vol. 61).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Goodchild, M 2010, Whose hand on the tiller? Revisiting “spatial statistical analysis and gis”. in Advances in Spatial Science. Advances in Spatial Science, vol. 61, Springer International Publishing, pp. 49-59. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-01976-0_4
Goodchild M. Whose hand on the tiller? Revisiting “spatial statistical analysis and gis”. In Advances in Spatial Science. Springer International Publishing. 2010. p. 49-59. (Advances in Spatial Science). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-01976-0_4
Goodchild, Michael. / Whose hand on the tiller? Revisiting “spatial statistical analysis and gis”. Advances in Spatial Science. Springer International Publishing, 2010. pp. 49-59 (Advances in Spatial Science).
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