Whom do employers want? The role of recent employment and unemployment status and age

Henry S. Farberfarber, Chris Herbst, Daniel Silverman, Till von Wachter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We use a résumé audit study to investigate the role of employment and unemployment histories in callbacks to job applications. We find that applicants with 52 weeks of unemployment have a lower callback rate than those with shorter spells. There is no relationship, however, between spell length and callback among applicants with spells of 24 weeks or less. We also find that both younger and older applicants have a lower callback probability than prime-aged applicants. Finally, we find that applicants who are employed at the time of application have a lower callback rate than do unemployed applicants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)323-349
Number of pages27
JournalJournal of Labor Economics
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

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Employers
Unemployment
Lower probabilities
Audit
Job applications

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Industrial relations
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

Whom do employers want? The role of recent employment and unemployment status and age. / Farberfarber, Henry S.; Herbst, Chris; Silverman, Daniel; von Wachter, Till.

In: Journal of Labor Economics, Vol. 37, No. 2, 01.04.2019, p. 323-349.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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