Who knows your HIV status? What HIV + patients and their network members know about each other

Gene A. Shelley, Harvey Bernard, Peter Killworth, Eugene Johnsen, Christopher McCarty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This research reports on an analysis of personal network data collected from 70 HIV-positive HIV/AIDS patients (48 men, 22 women; 45 black, 25 white). Issues examined were the conditions surrounding the difficulty of knowing information about social network members, including knowledge of HIV status. The stigmatizing nature of AIDS resulted in selective knowledge regarding a person's HIV status (and other information) among their social network members. Informants' networks appeared smaller than those for other groups we have investigated, and this may be due to informant self-limiting, or alter rejection of HIV informant. These results will be useful in determining the amount of HIV + in the general population, and these methods could be applied to other hard-to-count populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)189-217
Number of pages29
JournalSocial Networks
Volume17
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995
Externally publishedYes

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social network
AIDS
HIV
data network
Social Support
human being
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Group
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Who knows your HIV status? What HIV + patients and their network members know about each other. / Shelley, Gene A.; Bernard, Harvey; Killworth, Peter; Johnsen, Eugene; McCarty, Christopher.

In: Social Networks, Vol. 17, No. 3-4, 01.01.1995, p. 189-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shelley, Gene A. ; Bernard, Harvey ; Killworth, Peter ; Johnsen, Eugene ; McCarty, Christopher. / Who knows your HIV status? What HIV + patients and their network members know about each other. In: Social Networks. 1995 ; Vol. 17, No. 3-4. pp. 189-217.
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