Who gets what from government? Distributional consequences of child-care assistance policies

Alesha Durfee, Marcia K. Meyers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Given the fragmented structure of child-care assistance in the United States, it has been difficult to obtain accurate estimates of which families are assisted, through which mechanisms, and at what level. Making use of survey data from New York City, we analyze the distribution of several forms of public child-care assistance. Results suggest that about 40% of all families with young children receive some form of child-care assistance. Considering all forms of assistance, the distribution of child-care help is targeted in both expected and some unexpected ways. Implications of these results are discussed in the context of U.S. child-care policies governing access and benefit levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)733-748
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Marriage and Family
Volume68
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2006

Keywords

  • Child care
  • Family policy
  • Low-income families
  • Maternal employment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anthropology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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