Where have all the good jobs gone? - The effect of government service privatization on women workers

Marilyn Dantico, Nancy Jurik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper is an exploratory examination of the effects of government service privatization on women in the United States workforce. In the past decade, the process of transferring service provision from government to profit-making organizations has increased significantly, yet little systematic effort has been directed toward understanding the implications of this trend for workers. Our investigation draws on prior literature, secondary data, and a small primary data set to suggest ways in which increasing trends of government service privatization may adversely affect future work opportunities in the U.S., especially those available to women. Our investigation suggests that both relative to white males and absolutely, women's rank, wages, and future advancement opportunities will be negatively affected by declining government work opportunities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)421-439
Number of pages19
JournalContemporary Crises
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1987

Fingerprint

Privatization
privatization
worker
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
trend
wage
profit
Organizations
examination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Where have all the good jobs gone? - The effect of government service privatization on women workers. / Dantico, Marilyn; Jurik, Nancy.

In: Contemporary Crises, Vol. 10, No. 4, 12.1987, p. 421-439.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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