When the visual format of the color carrier word does and does not modulate the Stroop effect

Chris Blais, Derek Besner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

We investigated the impact of making the color carrier word visually unfamiliar via case and font mIxInG in the context of three Stroop experiments. Experiment 1 yielded an increase in the size of the Stroop effect when the color carrier words were visually unfamiliar relative to lowercase words that were case and font consistent. Experiments 2A and 2B showed that the modulation of the Stroop effect by visual familiarity observed in Experiment 1 was eliminated when there was no correlation between the color and the color carrier word. These results are considered in the light of four different theoretical accounts of the Stroop effect (strength of association [Cohen, Dunbar, & McClelland, 1990], instance [Logan, 1988], schema [MacLeod, 2000], and obligatory processing followed by deactivation [Coltheart, Woollams, Kinoshita, & Perry, 1999]). None of these accounts appear capable of explaining all the results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1337-1344
Number of pages8
JournalMemory and Cognition
Volume33
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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