When Ecology Needs Economics and Economics Needs Ecology: Interdisciplinary Exchange during the Anthropocene

S. Andrew Inkpen, C. Tyler DesRoches

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Evidence that humans play a dominant role in most ecosystems forces scientists to confront systems that contain factors transgressing traditional disciplinary boundaries. However, it is an open question whether this state of affairs should encourage interdisciplinary exchange or integration. With two case studies, we show that exchange between ecologists and economists is preferable, for epistemological and policy-oriented reasons, to their acting independently. We call this “exchange gain.” Our case studies show that theoretical exchanges can be less disruptive to current theory than commonly thought. Valuable interdisciplinary exchange does not necessarily require disciplinary breakdown.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)203-221
Number of pages19
JournalEthics, Policy and Environment
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2020

Keywords

  • Anthropocene
  • Ecology
  • Economics
  • Environmental Policy
  • Interdisciplinary Science

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Philosophy
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

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