When Do Friends Prevent Friends from Hooking Up Intoxicated? An Examination of Sex Differences and Hypothetical Intoxication in Peer Interventions

Matthew W. Savage, Lisa Menegatos, Anthony Roberto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite the risks involved when mixing alcohol with casual sexual activity, the majority of college students engage in hookups, and the majority of those hookups involve alcohol. This study focused on the protective role college students’ peers can play and the situational factors that might influence their willingness to intervene when a close friend is about to hook up intoxicated. Drawing on the theory of planned behavior (TPB), this study investigated differences in students’ (N = 1270) attitudes, norms, perceived behavioral control, and intentions to persuade a close friend not to engage in a hypothetical drunken hookup using a 2 (friend sex) × 2 (participant sex) × 2 (sober/intoxicated) factorial design. Results indicated significant differences in the TPB variables. Participants intended to intervene with female friends, but not male friends, and women were more likely to intervene than men. Participants in the sober condition had stronger intentions to intervene than those in the intoxicated condition, but this effect was driven by increases in men’s intentions when sober. Implications for theory and prevention programming are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-11
Number of pages11
JournalArchives of Sexual Behavior
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - May 4 2017

Fingerprint

Sex Characteristics
Students
Alcohols
Sexual Behavior
Sex Differences
Peers
Intentions
Intoxication
College Students
Alcohol
Sexual
Programming
Situational
Willingness

Keywords

  • Casual sex
  • College drinking
  • Hookup
  • Sexual decision-making
  • Theory of planned behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

@article{5707d8c356f34ab59d4c455bd19e31ad,
title = "When Do Friends Prevent Friends from Hooking Up Intoxicated? An Examination of Sex Differences and Hypothetical Intoxication in Peer Interventions",
abstract = "Despite the risks involved when mixing alcohol with casual sexual activity, the majority of college students engage in hookups, and the majority of those hookups involve alcohol. This study focused on the protective role college students’ peers can play and the situational factors that might influence their willingness to intervene when a close friend is about to hook up intoxicated. Drawing on the theory of planned behavior (TPB), this study investigated differences in students’ (N = 1270) attitudes, norms, perceived behavioral control, and intentions to persuade a close friend not to engage in a hypothetical drunken hookup using a 2 (friend sex) × 2 (participant sex) × 2 (sober/intoxicated) factorial design. Results indicated significant differences in the TPB variables. Participants intended to intervene with female friends, but not male friends, and women were more likely to intervene than men. Participants in the sober condition had stronger intentions to intervene than those in the intoxicated condition, but this effect was driven by increases in men’s intentions when sober. Implications for theory and prevention programming are discussed.",
keywords = "Casual sex, College drinking, Hookup, Sexual decision-making, Theory of planned behavior",
author = "Savage, {Matthew W.} and Lisa Menegatos and Anthony Roberto",
year = "2017",
month = "5",
day = "4",
doi = "10.1007/s10508-017-0969-6",
language = "English (US)",
pages = "1--11",
journal = "Archives of Sexual Behavior",
issn = "0004-0002",
publisher = "Springer New York",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - When Do Friends Prevent Friends from Hooking Up Intoxicated? An Examination of Sex Differences and Hypothetical Intoxication in Peer Interventions

AU - Savage, Matthew W.

AU - Menegatos, Lisa

AU - Roberto, Anthony

PY - 2017/5/4

Y1 - 2017/5/4

N2 - Despite the risks involved when mixing alcohol with casual sexual activity, the majority of college students engage in hookups, and the majority of those hookups involve alcohol. This study focused on the protective role college students’ peers can play and the situational factors that might influence their willingness to intervene when a close friend is about to hook up intoxicated. Drawing on the theory of planned behavior (TPB), this study investigated differences in students’ (N = 1270) attitudes, norms, perceived behavioral control, and intentions to persuade a close friend not to engage in a hypothetical drunken hookup using a 2 (friend sex) × 2 (participant sex) × 2 (sober/intoxicated) factorial design. Results indicated significant differences in the TPB variables. Participants intended to intervene with female friends, but not male friends, and women were more likely to intervene than men. Participants in the sober condition had stronger intentions to intervene than those in the intoxicated condition, but this effect was driven by increases in men’s intentions when sober. Implications for theory and prevention programming are discussed.

AB - Despite the risks involved when mixing alcohol with casual sexual activity, the majority of college students engage in hookups, and the majority of those hookups involve alcohol. This study focused on the protective role college students’ peers can play and the situational factors that might influence their willingness to intervene when a close friend is about to hook up intoxicated. Drawing on the theory of planned behavior (TPB), this study investigated differences in students’ (N = 1270) attitudes, norms, perceived behavioral control, and intentions to persuade a close friend not to engage in a hypothetical drunken hookup using a 2 (friend sex) × 2 (participant sex) × 2 (sober/intoxicated) factorial design. Results indicated significant differences in the TPB variables. Participants intended to intervene with female friends, but not male friends, and women were more likely to intervene than men. Participants in the sober condition had stronger intentions to intervene than those in the intoxicated condition, but this effect was driven by increases in men’s intentions when sober. Implications for theory and prevention programming are discussed.

KW - Casual sex

KW - College drinking

KW - Hookup

KW - Sexual decision-making

KW - Theory of planned behavior

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85018731944&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85018731944&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10508-017-0969-6

DO - 10.1007/s10508-017-0969-6

M3 - Article

SP - 1

EP - 11

JO - Archives of Sexual Behavior

JF - Archives of Sexual Behavior

SN - 0004-0002

ER -