When a Threat to the Brand Is a Threat to the Self

The Importance of Brand Identification and Implicit Self-Esteem in Predicting Defensiveness

Monika Lisjak, Angela Y. Lee, Wendi L. Gardner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This research examines how people respond when a commercial brand they identify with is threatened. Across four studies, the authors found that among participants who identified with a brand, a threat to the brand elicited the same responses as a threat to the self. Specifically, participants with low implicit self-esteem defended the brand when the self was activated, unlike their high implicit self-esteem counterparts. In addition, brand defense was reduced when individuals had the opportunity to affirm a valued aspect of their self-concept. These findings suggest that when a brand that people identify with is threatened, they may defend the brand to preserve the integrity of the self. More broadly, these findings are consistent with the notion that brands may be included into the extended self-concept, which supports William James's original ideas concerning the breadth and heterogeneity of the self.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1120-1132
Number of pages13
JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Volume38
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ego
Self Concept
Identification (Psychology)
Research

Keywords

  • brand identification
  • extended self
  • implicit self-esteem
  • self-concept
  • self-threat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

Cite this

When a Threat to the Brand Is a Threat to the Self : The Importance of Brand Identification and Implicit Self-Esteem in Predicting Defensiveness. / Lisjak, Monika; Lee, Angela Y.; Gardner, Wendi L.

In: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Vol. 38, No. 9, 09.2012, p. 1120-1132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{876cdf601c204494ad2d3124bc7d0eb5,
title = "When a Threat to the Brand Is a Threat to the Self: The Importance of Brand Identification and Implicit Self-Esteem in Predicting Defensiveness",
abstract = "This research examines how people respond when a commercial brand they identify with is threatened. Across four studies, the authors found that among participants who identified with a brand, a threat to the brand elicited the same responses as a threat to the self. Specifically, participants with low implicit self-esteem defended the brand when the self was activated, unlike their high implicit self-esteem counterparts. In addition, brand defense was reduced when individuals had the opportunity to affirm a valued aspect of their self-concept. These findings suggest that when a brand that people identify with is threatened, they may defend the brand to preserve the integrity of the self. More broadly, these findings are consistent with the notion that brands may be included into the extended self-concept, which supports William James's original ideas concerning the breadth and heterogeneity of the self.",
keywords = "brand identification, extended self, implicit self-esteem, self-concept, self-threat",
author = "Monika Lisjak and Lee, {Angela Y.} and Gardner, {Wendi L.}",
year = "2012",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1177/0146167212445300",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "38",
pages = "1120--1132",
journal = "Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin",
issn = "0146-1672",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - When a Threat to the Brand Is a Threat to the Self

T2 - The Importance of Brand Identification and Implicit Self-Esteem in Predicting Defensiveness

AU - Lisjak, Monika

AU - Lee, Angela Y.

AU - Gardner, Wendi L.

PY - 2012/9

Y1 - 2012/9

N2 - This research examines how people respond when a commercial brand they identify with is threatened. Across four studies, the authors found that among participants who identified with a brand, a threat to the brand elicited the same responses as a threat to the self. Specifically, participants with low implicit self-esteem defended the brand when the self was activated, unlike their high implicit self-esteem counterparts. In addition, brand defense was reduced when individuals had the opportunity to affirm a valued aspect of their self-concept. These findings suggest that when a brand that people identify with is threatened, they may defend the brand to preserve the integrity of the self. More broadly, these findings are consistent with the notion that brands may be included into the extended self-concept, which supports William James's original ideas concerning the breadth and heterogeneity of the self.

AB - This research examines how people respond when a commercial brand they identify with is threatened. Across four studies, the authors found that among participants who identified with a brand, a threat to the brand elicited the same responses as a threat to the self. Specifically, participants with low implicit self-esteem defended the brand when the self was activated, unlike their high implicit self-esteem counterparts. In addition, brand defense was reduced when individuals had the opportunity to affirm a valued aspect of their self-concept. These findings suggest that when a brand that people identify with is threatened, they may defend the brand to preserve the integrity of the self. More broadly, these findings are consistent with the notion that brands may be included into the extended self-concept, which supports William James's original ideas concerning the breadth and heterogeneity of the self.

KW - brand identification

KW - extended self

KW - implicit self-esteem

KW - self-concept

KW - self-threat

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84864607094&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84864607094&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0146167212445300

DO - 10.1177/0146167212445300

M3 - Article

VL - 38

SP - 1120

EP - 1132

JO - Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin

JF - Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin

SN - 0146-1672

IS - 9

ER -